Alabama Pathways

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes: Writing an Objective

 

Learning outcomes are the result of the objective(s) identified for your session. Objectives for your proposal must be stated in behavioral terms. Courses can be geared for specific levels of learner outcome. The hierarchy of behavioral learning is: knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Please use the attached verb list chart to assist you in writing effective and measurable behavioral objectives for your proposal. A minimum of 2 behavioral objectives are required for a 2 hour workshop.

The behavioral objective and test questions will be used to assess the quality of the educational program you are submitting for course. Your proposal will not be accepted unless this requirement is met.
Each objective must include the following components:

Condition        =  Using what guidelines or in what type of setting?

Performance    =  What the learner is expected to do or perform as a result.

Criterion          =  Describe how well; i.e., what is the minimal level of performance?

 

Examples of appropriate behavioral objectives:

 

  • At the completion of the training the participants will be able to list three reading readiness assessment measures that are appropriate for preschool.
  • This session will enable the learner to utilize at least three different ways to implement a “print rich” environment their early learning classroom(s).
  • Upon completion of the session the participant will be able to list the features of three different areas of preschool curriculum language development components.

 

Examples of Inappropriate objectives

 

  • The student will have an opportunity to hear from national and regional experts about promoting and enhancing best practices in the preschool classroom.

 

  • Upon completion of the session the participant will discover new ways to help young children develop their language skills.

 

Verb List for Writing Measurable Behavioral Objectives

 

Knowledge

Cite

Count

Define

Draw

Identify

Indicate

List

Name

Point

Read

Recite

Recognize

Record

Relate

Repeat

Select

State

Tabulate

Tell

Trace

Write

Comprehension

Associate

Classify

Compare

Compute

Contrast

Describe

Differentiate

Discuss

Distinguish

Explain

Estimate

Express

Extrapolate

Interpret

Interpolate

Locate

Predict

Report

Restate

Review

Translate

Application

Apply

Calculate

Complete

Demonstrate

Dramatize

Employ

Examine

Illustrate

Interpolate

Locate

Operate

Order

Predict

Practice

Relate

Report

Restate

Review

Schedule

Sketch

Solve

Translate

Use

Utilize

Analysis

Analyze

Appraise

Contrast

Criticize

Debate

Diagram

Differentiate

Distinguish

Experiment

Infer

Inspect

Inventory

Question

Separate

Summarize

Synthesis

Arrange

Assemble

Collect

Compose

Construct

Create

Design

Detect

Formulate

Generalize

Integrate

Manage

Organize

Plan

Produce

Propose

Specify

Evaluation

Appraise

Assess

Choose

Critique

Determine

Estimate

Evaluate

Grade

Judge

Measure

Rank

Rate

Recommend

Revise

Score

Select

Test

 

 

 Methods for Assessing Learning Outcomes

Assessing outcomes allows trainers to determine if participants achieved their goal and met learning objectives. The assessment of learning outcomes aids in accountability.

  1. Plan your assessments before you begin.

When developing a course, use your goals and objectives to determine what will be assessed. Make note of what kinds of assessments you’ll use and how often you will implement them. Make sure the assessments address the learning outcomes.

 

  1. Assess frequently.

Make sure you have checkpoints along the way in order to truly measure participant learning.   Assessments give insight on how you may need to adjust your pacing and instructional methods. If the majority of your class is performing well and on-schedule, then you can plan to continue the track you’re currently navigating. If a large number of participants are producing poor results, you may need to slow down the pace of your instruction or even make changes in the ways you’re delivering the material. If you see that only a few participants are struggling, you can implement interventions that target these specific few.

 

  1. Vary your assessments.

Participants won’t all be strong in the same areas. One participant may perform best on written tests, whereas another participant may excel in a hands-on project. Be creative in your assessment designs.

 

Formal Evaluation/Assessment Activities for Assessing Expected Learning Outcomes:

Application activities such as participants creating a learning center, a math game, tell a story using age appropriate language and pictures, etc. Demonstration in which participants illustrate appropriate strategies, techniques and procedures. 
Group discussion as participants share ideas and their application, examples from their own experiences of success and challenge. Brainstorming during which participants offer suggestions for solving a problem, completing a task, etc. 
Exam/Quiz in which the instructor develops a preview and review of information based on course content. Role play for which group members create or are given a scenario relevant to the course to enact.

 

After deciding on the strategy you will employ in teaching your course, write an instructor statement for the section titled Assessment of Learning Outcomes on the needs assessment.  Customize the statement to your teaching style and the Learning Outcome(s) for the course.  Here are some examples:

*   Participants will brainstorm, identifying ten (10) effective transition activities.

*   Participants will role play telling a story to a group of four-year olds using a story, language and

pictures that are age-appropriate.

*   Group members will share an example and a non-example of an appropriate guidance

strategy for two-year olds.

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